Tag Archives: Adventure

How to Smell Like the Wilderness

17 Oct

ImageWe found this post at Esquire Magazine (the issue with Scarlett Johansson on the cover). We are not going to say that she isn’t sexy…but sexiest woman alive is a bold statement and a title worth deserving. Does she? We digress. The article caught our attention with the title “How to Smell like the Wilderness.” Sounds manly! It sure is. You can follow the whole process of how the scents are crafted, complete with images, at esquire.com

How to Smell Like a Man

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When you get down to it, most of our soaps and colognes are made in places that look scarily like labratories. Even the ones that proudly exclaim that they’re all-natural. Not so with Juniper Ridge. The company makes soaps, colognes, and sprays that smell great, but they do it in a decidedly non-laboratorial manner. In fact, they concoct many of their fragrances using a vintage whiskey still, though sometimes they go moonshine style, over a campfire. These people are, as we found out firsthand, a bunch of bourbon-loving, beer-swigging, meat-grilling Californians who just happen to have a thing for tracking down and capturing the scent of the woods.

They’ve got a gold miner’s mission, a sommelier’s nose, and a distinct appreciation for the wilderness of the American West, all of which were on display when we hitched a ride with Juniper Ridge this past July on the trail in the Tahoe National Forest. We were there to concoct a new scent, or an “aromatic snapshot,” as they like to call it. You see, the ingredients the company works so hard to find aren’t just specific to their locations but also to the season — some flowers they use bloom for only a few weeks each year.

Oh, and yes: Juniper Ridge is all-natural. Doggedly so. Bark, sap, leaves, twigs, grass, flower petals, stems — these ingredients come courtesy of the wilderness. And there are no synthetics in the mix, either; it’s either pure sugarcane alcohol or organic duck fat (the company is definitely not vegetarian). Because of this, each batch of products is entirely unique, a reflection of the season’s bounty that captures a moment in time in much the same way a good bottle of wine does.

Read more: Juniper Ridge – All Natural Grooming Products Juniper Ridge – Esquire

Man Skills: Start a Fire with Your Car Battery

24 Feb

The latest issue of Men’s Journal Magazine (the one with a sick green Triumph Scrambler motorcycle on the cover) has a segment called “Survival Skills with Bear Grylls” in which they ask him a series of questions about adventuring, survival, manliness and his active life.  One of the questions they asked?  What is one skill that every man should have? Bear’s answer?  The ability to start a fire with your car battery. “I’ve had to do this a lot while camping with my family when I didn’t have matches or a lighter.”

 

Step 1: run your fingers through the grass.  The dead stuff will come off in your hands.

Step 2: Create a little bird’s nest with this dry grass.  Then run your jumper cables to it and ignite it.

Step 3: Add the ignited grass to a big pile of kindling, and you’ll have your fire.

BOOM.

Perfect Weekend: Scuba Diving Middle America

26 May

Having recently completed a scuba diving class only to take on a completely underwhelming dive on my honeymoon, I completely understand wanting to take more exciting and breathtaking dives.  Believe me.  This is why I am thankful for Men’s Journal.  In the June/July 2010 issue (Lance Armstrong’s 8th cover appearance), they highlight the perfect weekend: scuba diving middle america in an abandoned mine which has turned into an underwater ghost town.

Six hundred miles from the nearest ocean, eastern Missouri isn’t an obvious choice for scuba diving.  But the rural hamlet of Bonne Terre offers world-class diving just the same – in a former lead mine 60 miles due south of St. Louis.  From the 1860’s until 1961, the Bonne Terre Mine became the largest lead mine in the world, yielding millions of tons of lead ore.  After it shuttered, a billion gallons of groundwater flooded the 80-square-mile labyrinth, creating the world’s largest man-made underground lake and turning the former mine into the ultimate underwater playground – a cross between cavern and wreck diving, with eerie tunnels crusty with antiquated equipment hidden in the shadows.

More than 50 chartered trails are in the mine, threading narrow tunnels littered with old magazines, rock drills, and half-filled ore carts that still sit where miners dropped them 50 years ago, like the last vestiges of a working man’s Atlantis.  The most popular paths are overhung with stadium lighting, which illuminates the water’s 150 feet of visibility.  Wetsuits are highly recommended – the water stays a brisk 60 degrees year-round.  To avoid getting lost in the industrial-sized ant farm, certified divers must go in the water with guides from the on-site dive center, which is open on weekends and provides gear and scuba classes, as well as accommodations in a historic railroad depot restored as a bed-and-breakfast (packages from $210; 2dive.com).